Ready, Set, Plant! Tips for getting your garden off to a great start

Stacks of lush spring plants are hard for just about any gardener to resist!  Before buying, don’t forget to read plant labels and make sure conditions in your garden and the plant’s cultural requirements are a match. (Photo by Joe Scarlata)

Plant sales abound this time of year and whether you’ve been shopping at neighborhood  plant swaps or browsing through local nurseries — you know how energizing the experience can be. But once you arrive home,  do you ever find yourself saying, “Now what?”  If so, we’ve got you covered!  We love plants sales too, so we’ve put together a few Master Gardener “Tips of the Trade” that will have you digging in to this– the most optimistic of garden seasons–with excitement and confidence.


It’s planting time!  The frost free date in central New Jersey is on or after May 10 –so now’s the time for gardeners to get growing.


Ready or not: What to do if planting’s on pause…

If you’re NOT planning to transplant your new plants immediately,  remember to water them as needed and protect them from animals and harsh elements such as frost and wind until you are ready to plant them.

For the best results for all of your garden plants–as well as your lawn–you should know the pH and nutrient level of your soil.  To do this, have a soil test run.  You can stop by the Extension Office to purchase a soil mailer, or call the Extension Office at 609‑989-6830 for more information.

Planting  101: Steps to help your new plants thrive

The following tips apply to most newly-purchased plants.  But, be sure to check plant labels first for any variety-specific instructions.

SITE CONSIDERATIONS: Read plant labels carefully before selecting planting sites. Plants have different requirements for sun/shade, soil condition and drainage.

Individual annuals and perennials have different requirements for sun, shade, partial sun, soil quality, and drainage. When deciding what plant to put where, also consider a plant’s mature height and whether you will you be able to see and enjoy it among its garden companions. (Photo by Joe Scarlata)

Also, since plants have different growth patterns and rates of growth, consider the spread and the height of the plant at maturity.

In addition, two other factors should be considered:  visibility (planting in order for the plant to be seen and enjoyed) and accessibility (planting in order to for the plant be accessible for fertilizing, dead heading and/or pruning).

Make sure to remove weeds and debris before planting. It’s also a good idea to add some organic matter–like compost –into the soil to help new transplants thrive.  (Photo by Theodora Wang)

SOIL PREPARATION: Remove all weeds and other debris from the planting site.  Loosen soil for good root growth and mix in organic matter (compost, well rotted manure or peat moss) to amend the soil. If a recent soil test was performed, refer to the report for information regarding recommended lime and fertilizer. If no soil test has been done, fertilize with 10-10-10 at 2 lb. per 100 square feet, or follow the label directions on a fertilizer for flower or herb gardens. Spade or rototill amendments to a depth of 6-8 inches for most annuals or perennials.

The best time to install your plants is on a cloudy day, which reduces the chance of sun and/or heat stress on new transplants. (Photo by Joe Scarlata)

PLANTING: Hardy perennials, trees and shrubs can be planted immediately. (The frost-free day in central New Jersey is on or about May 10.) If tender plants– aka annuals– are threatened by frost, be prepared to cover them.

Plant at any time on a cloudy day, or early morning or late afternoon on a sunny day.  Prepare a space at least twice the size of the plant container and almost as deep. Remove the plant from the container and loosen or cut the roots slightly to encourage growth. Plant at the same depth as the plant was in the container. Gently settle soil around the roots, being careful not to leave air pockets around the roots.  Water thoroughly.

MAINTENANCE: Water early in the morning (preferable) as plant species require. Use a rain gauge to determine how much rain had fallen and adjust watering schedule accordingly.  Mulch will help maintain soil moisture, temperature and deter weeds. Mulch depth should never exceed two inches.

GARDEN HELP: For more planting information, or if you are having plant, tree or lawn problems, please call the MASTER GARDENER HELPLINE (609-989-6853), Monday through Friday from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. You can also visit our website at www.mgofmc.org for more information from the Rutgers Cooperative Extension and Barbara J. Bromley.

Looking for inspiration? Stop by Mercer County Educational Gardens which feature a variety of beautiful plants– all of which are proven to thrive in our area. (Photo by Joe Scarlata)

GARDEN INSPIRATION: Don’t forget to visit our Educational Gardens  this summer when the gardens are in their full glory, the flowers are in bloom and the butterflies are visiting.  For information about coming activities, check out our Events page.

Happy planting!


More info:

Basics of Flower Gardening

Planting High Visibility Flower Beds

10+ Most Common Gardening Mistakes

 

2017 Plant Expo


Rutgers Master Gardeners of Mercer County wish to thank everyone who supported our annual plant sale!  We hope the plants you purchased are beautiful additions to your garden and that you enjoy them as much as we have enjoyed bringing them to you!


Master Gardener Plant Expo 2017


This year’s sale day is sure to be fun for seasoned gardeners and novice gardeners alike!

The plant sale will feature the ever-popular Rutgers Master Gardener home-grown perennials, trees and shrubs and a garden market of plant material sold by selected top-notch nurseries from New Jersey and Pennsylvania.

This is a unique opportunity to talk with vendors and purchase a wide assortment of native plants, woody ornamentals, perennials, herbs, annuals and tropical plants. This year we will welcome a new local vendor featuring certified organic plants. Tomatoes, tomatoes, tomatoes (Rutgers varieties and heirlooms) as well as many hot pepper varieties will be in abundance.

Mercer County Horticulturist Barbara J. Bromley will be answering gardening questions and Rutgers Master Gardeners will be on hand to help choose the right plant for the right place.

Click here for a scalable map and location guide:

2017 Plant Expo Map

Plan to come early for best selection and stay to enjoy every aspect of Expo. This event will be held rain or shine and there is plenty of free parking. Credit cards, personal checks and cash are accepted at the sale.

Check out some of this year’s selections below: 


Home-Grown Plants

Master Gardener-grown plants are the most popular part of Plant Expo!

People line up very early to get the best selection of home-grown perennials, trees and shrubs and return year after year to check out the selection. Whether you have a shade garden or a sunny butterfly garden, you can find something of interest in the Home-Grown area. Of course, there is no guarantee that every variety will be available on sale day but there will be a wide assortment of plants.

Click below for list of home-grown plants for this year’s sale:

2017 Plant Expo Home-Grown Plant Selections


Jersey Tomatoes!

Home-grown tomatoes and peppers will be in abundance, including the popular Rutgers tomato varieties, Rutgers, Ramapo, Moreton, Rutgers 250, KC-146 and Rutgers 39. Rutgers Master Gardener Bruce Young has started the tomatoes and peppers from seed for the sale and has potted up over 1,000 tomatoes. Along with the Rutgers varieties of tomatoes there will be lots heirloom varieties. Patio, cherry, and plum, to name a few types, will be available for purchase. Popular and some different Hot pepper varieties will be offered.

Click below for list of tomatoes and peppers being grown for this year’s sale:

2017 Plant Expo Tomatoes 

2017 Plant Expo Peppers

We will try hard to have each variety listed available on sale day but there are no guarantees!


Select Local Plant Vendors

Our hand-picked plant purveyors offer a variety of plants uniquely suited for local gardens.    

This is a unique opportunity to talk with vendors and purchase a wide assortment of native plants, woody ornamentals, perennials, herbs, annuals and tropical plants. This year we will welcome a new local vendor featuring certified organic plants.

To view a list of our select group of local plant purveyors, click here: 

2017 Plant Expo Vendors


Second-Hand Sale 


The ever popular Second-Hand Sale of garden-related items will be back this year. Pots galore, baskets and books to name a few, will definitely be available this year.  There are always a few surprises and you really never know what treasure you might find.


Pest Alert: What You Need to Know About the Emerald Ash Borer

Emerald Ash Borer adult (Photo State of NJ Department of Agriculture)

The exotic emerald ash borer (EAB) has been killing ash trees across North America. Native to China, eastern Russia, Japan, and Korea, it was first discovered near Detroit in 2002 and has since spread to 25 states, including New Jersey.

Ash in New Jersey Facts

• Forests contain 24.7 million ash trees

• 24% of all forested land contains ash

• Ash is found in forests throughout the state, but concentrated in northern New Jersey

• Ash has been commonly planted as a street and landscape tree throughout the state

EAB: Deadly Damage to Millions of Trees

This metallic green insect infests and kills ash trees—all ash species are susceptible, with the exception of mountain ash. EAB larvae feed on the inner bark and disrupt the movement of water and nutrients, essentially girdling the tree. This insect often infests the upper branches of the tree first and may affect branches as small as 1” in diameter. It takes 2-4 years for infested trees to die, but mortality is imminent.

Since its discovery in North America, EAB has spread rapidly. It occurs in 25 states and 2 Canadian provinces. It was first discovered in NJ in 2014. The greatest impact will be for community trees and privately owned trees. The beetles are strong fliers, and good at finding ash trees. When the beetle first arrived in Maryland, the infested area expanded about ½ mile per year. Often people unintentionally spread this insect when they move firewood from an infested area to a new location. Beetles and larvae also hitchhike to a new area in nursery trees and saw logs.

Is your tree an ash? Ash trees have compound leaves with five, seven, nine or 11 leaflets. See additional links at the end of this post to assist in determining if a tree is an ash, or contact your local Rutgers Cooperative Extension office. (Photo State of NJ Department of Agriculture)

 

What to Look for: Signs and Symptoms

Often the first sign that a tree is infested is woodpecker damage. When feeding on EAB, woodpeckers scrape off outer bark, leaving smooth, light colored patches.

Several woodpecker species feed on EAB larvae. Heavy woodpecker damage on ash trees may be a sign of infestation. (Photo New Jersey EAB Task Force)

Under the bark of an infested tree, you can often see S-shaped galleries weaving back and forth on the surface of the wood.

Feeding EAB larvae leave serpentine galleries across the woodgrain. (Photo New Jersey EAB Task Force)

The beetles also leave 1/8” D-shaped exit holes. Between May and August, you may find the ½” long metallic green adult beetles which have a copper color abdomen under the wing covers.  For additional symptoms of EAB infestation, see  Signs and Symptoms of the Emerald Ash Borer

Adults leave D-shaped exit holes in the bark when they emerge in the spring. (Photo New Jersey EAB Task Force)

Managing Your Ash Trees

EAB is in New Jersey. Plan for EAB now if you have ash. Know what’s at risk: how much ash you have, its size and quality, and where it’s located. Consider the ecological, aesthetic, and economic value of your ash, your tolerance of risk, and your objectives for ownership.  Use the assessment tool below to determine your best course of action:

Assess-ash-trees-chart

Forest Management

If your land is enrolled in Farmland Assessment or the Forest Stewardship Programs, you must follow your approved forest management plan or an approved amendment. Contact your consulting forester if you wish to change your planned activities, treatment schedule, or management objectives. Remember that the state forester needs to approve any changes before the management activity begins.

With an approved forest management plan that addresses EAB, you can salvage and restore ash in riparian areas when they follow the prescribed Best Management Practices. Reassess your plan if EAB is detected in or near your county. To date, EAB has been found in Somerset, Mercer and Burlington Counties. The threat of imminent tree mortality increases when EAB is within 10 miles of your property.

Take Action: What You Can Do

EAB adults emerging from D-shaped holes in the bark. (Photo by Debbie Miller)

Identify ash trees. Ash species have opposite branches and leaves and a compound leaf with 5-11 leaflets. The bark has a unique diamond-shaped ridge bark on older trees, but younger trees may have smoother bark.
Monitor your ash trees for EAB, you will know when the risk of mortality becomes urgent. Look for the dying branches at the top of the tree, woodpecker damage, galleries under the bark, D-shaped holes, green adult beetle, and sprouting.

Spread the message, “Don’t Move Firewood.” Visitors who bring infested firewood to second homes or campgrounds near you put your trees at risk. Talk with neighbors and campground owners in your community.

Damaging EAB larvae are creamy white and legless.

Report EAB sightings to the NJ Department of Agriculture. Collect and/or photograph any suspect insects and larvae. Note that several insects look similar to the EAB.


Over the next few years, 99% of NJ ash trees will die due to emerald ash borer infestations


Where to Get More Information

NJ residents are encouraged to visit the New Jersey Emerald Ash Borer websitewww.emeraldashborer.nj.gov where they can find resources on how to protect their ash trees and what to do with dead or dying trees.

Additional information on EAB: